Modern Tugboat Engines

Electro-Motive Diesel (EMD)

Models 645 and 710

Above: A Cutaway View of the EMD 16-645 Marine Diesel Engine

**********

HISTORY OF THE EMD 645 AND 710

The Electro-Motive 645 and 710 series diesels are used in many modern tugs as well as a wide variety of other marine propulsion and generating applications. Both engine series are two-stroke cycle 45 degree Vee diesel engines using unit fuel injection systems, the model name is the swept displacement of each cylinder of the engine expressed in cubic inches. The 645 series engine has a cylinder bore of 9-1/16 inches and a stroke of 10 inches, and was built in 8, 12, and 16 cylinder "normally aspirated" (roots blower) configurations and in 8, 12, 16, and 20 cylinder turbocharged versions. The 710 series engine also has 9-1/16 inch bore, but with 11 inch stroke, and was introduced in the 1980s as an enhanced fuel economy and reduced emissions engine. The 710 is only built in turbocharged versions, with 8, 12, 16, or 20 cylinders, and has been produced with mechanically controlled fuel injection as well as electronic injection systems. Both engine series were in production simultaneously from 1983 through the late 1990s, the 645 series has now been discontinued.

The 645 and 710 series are the successors to the EMD 567 series engines, first built in 1938, which were used in many railroad applications and are still quite common in marine service. The 567 series engines have 8-1/2 inch bore with 10 inch stroke. The 567 series went out of production following the introduction of the 645 series engines in 1966.

Electro-Motive dates back to the 1920s, when it was established as a designer of gas-electric railroad passenger cars in Cleveland, Ohio. It was acquired by General Motors in 1930 along with the neighboring Winton Engine Company. It became the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD), a major builder of diesel locomotives and marine engines. After seven decades under GM control, it recently became an independent company, Electro-Motive Diesel, with manufacturing facilities in La Grange, Illinois and London, Ontario.

**********

Above: A 16-645 Marine Engine at La Grange in the 1960s. Notice the deep sump oil pan required on most marine installations to allow for the rolling of the vessel when operating in heavy seas.

**********

Above: Following its use in testing, the First EMD 710 Series Engine was painted in Pontiac GTO metallic blue and was used for many years as a show engine. When it was on display at boat shows the oil pan was usually not shown, since it really was a locomotive engine, not a marine engine, and did not have a deep sump oil pan.

**********

Above: Electro-Motive had a curious history in the marine industry. The EMD engines were originally designed for railroad locomotive use, while Cleveland Diesel Division of GM built the marine diesel engines. At the beginning of World War Two, there was a shortage of marine engine building capacity, and EMD engines were installed in three U.S. Navy fleet tugs. The installation was highly successful, and resulted in their being awarded the contract for more than 2400 engines for U.S. Navy LST vessels (as shown in the background above). In the postwar years Electro-Motive took market share away from Cleveland Diesel and eventually absorbed them.

**********

Above: An EMD 20-cylinder 645 series engine is prepared for installation at a shipyard. Sitting next to the engine is the Falk reverse reduction gear.

**********

Above: Two EMD 20 cylinder 645 series marine engines are show in the engine room of a vessel that has a combining reverse reduction gear, both engines drive one propeller shaft. The 20-645 was a very popular marine engine for installation in new construction vessels from its introduction in 1966 through the release of the subsequent EMD 710 series engines in the 1980s.

**********

Images courtesy of Electro-Motive Diesel

**********

LINK TO THE INSIDE EMD PROGRAM PAGE

LINK TO THE EMD TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS PAGE

LINK TO EMD 567 ENGINE ARTICLE PAGE

 

This is a group effort!

Submissions of text and photos for articles are welcome!

CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO THE TUG INFO INDEX

Please visit our other tug information pages!

 

© 2007. Tugboat Enthusiasts Society of the Americas